Exam Board Subject Leader
AQA Mr D Dwyer

More information about this page will be added in the coming weeks.

Non-Examination Assessment

Throughout the course students are assessed on their skills in spoken language. This is assessed by their teacher for a separate endorsement and does not contribute to their overall GCSE score. Students' are assessed on how they present information and ideas for different purposes and audiences.

 

Paper One: Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing

The aim of this paper is to engage students in a creative text and inspire them to write creatively themselves. The written exam lasts for 1 hour and 45 minutes, and is worth a total of 80 marks. It is split into two sections:

  • Part A: Reading (40 marks, 25% of GCSE)

    Students will read one literary fiction text (20th or 21st century) in order to consider how established writers use narrative and descriptive techniques to capture the interest of readers, (critical reading and comprehension). Students will answer four questions which will text their understanding of the text and their analysis of language and structure and will focus on AO1, AO2, AO4:

    • 1 short form question (4 marks)
    • 2 longer form questions (8 marks each)
    • 1 extended question (20 marks)
  • Part B: Writing (40 marks, 25% of GCSE)

    Students will write their own creative text, inspired by the topic that they have responded to in section A to demonstrate their narrative and descriptive skills in response to a written prompt, scenario or visual image, (producing clear and coherent text and writing for impact). Students will complete one prescribed extended writing question (24 marks for content and organisation, 16 marks for technical accuracy) and will be assessed for AO5 and AO6.

 

Paper Two: Writer's Viewpoints and Perspectives

The aim of this paper is to develop student’ insights into how writers have particular viewpoints and perspectives on issues or themes that are important to the way we think and live our lives.The written exam lasts for 1 hour and 45 minutes, and is worth a total of 80 marks. It is split into two sections:

  • Part A: Reading (40 marks, 25% of GCSE)

    Students will be given two linked sources of a non-fiction text and a literary non-fiction text, they will draw from the 19th century and either the 20th or 21st century to consider how the writer’s perspective or viewpoint will influence the reader. Students will answer four questions from the two linked texts which will text their understanding of the text and their analysis of language and structure and will focus on AO1, AO2, AO4:

    • 1 short form question (4 marks)
    • 2 longer form questions (8 marks each)
    • 1 extended question (20 marks)
  • Part B: Writing (40 marks, 25% of GCSE)

    Students will produce one extended writing question (24 marks for content and organisation, 16 marks for technical accuracy). Students must produce a written task for a specified audience, purpose and form in which they must give their own perspective on a theme that has been introduced in section A of paper, students will be assessed for AO5 and AO6. 

 

Reading Sources for Papers One and Two

The sources for the reading questions will be non-fiction and literary non-fiction texts. They will be drawn from the 19th century, and either the 20th or 21st century depending on the time period assessed in Paper 1 in each particular series. The combination selected will always provide students with an opportunity to consider viewpoints and perspectives over time. Choice of genre will include: ‘high quality journalism, articles, reports, essays, travel writing, accounts, sketches, letters, diaries, autobiography and biographical passages or other appropriate non-fiction and literary non-fiction forms.’

 

Assessment Objectives

Examiners are looking for different skills in different texts and examinations when they are marking your work. These skills are known as assessment objectives and they will vary between exams. English literature and English language have different assessment objectives. It is worth learning the different assessment objectives to be clear what you are going to be examined on. (Assessment objectives (AOs) are set by Ofqual and are the same across exam boards).

The exams will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives in English language:

  • AO1:
    • identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas
    • select and synthesise evidence from different texts
  • AO2: Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views.
  • AO3: Compare writers - ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, across two or more texts.
  • AO4: Evaluate texts critically and support this with appropriate textual references.
  • AO5: Communicate clearly, effectively and imaginatively, selecting and adapting tone, style and register for different forms, purposes and audiences. Organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical features to support coherence and cohesion of texts.
  • AO6: Candidates must use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation. (This requirement must constitute 20% of the marks for each specification as a whole.)

 

Progression and Complementary Studies

We currently offer English literature at A level. As a core subject, English is popular and highly regarded at A-Level and beyond. It  combines well with most subjects. Pupils can proceed not only to a degree in English but also in fields such as film or media studies. English provides an ideal springboard for a variety of careers such as law, publishing, journalism, advertising and teaching.